Last edited by UNICEF
03.06.2021 | History

2 edition of Guidelines for monitoring the availability and use of obstetric services found in the catalog.

Guidelines for monitoring the availability and use of obstetric services

a study of crucial aspects

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Published by Administrator in UNICEF

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  • United States
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        StatementUNICEF
        PublishersUNICEF
        Classifications
        LC Classifications1997
        The Physical Object
        Paginationxvi, 107 p. :
        Number of Pages90
        ID Numbers
        ISBN 109280631985
        Series
        1nodata
        2
        3

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Mean distance to UAMS hospital 82. TX At-home monitoring Pregnancy, diabetes, hypertension VA Live video Specialty procedures like obstetric ultrasound At-home monitoring Pregnant women who are injecting insulin NOTES: This is not an exhaustive list of telemedicine services covered during pregnancy under Medicaid. Despite of health facility availability in almost all administrative areas in the province, the availability of and access to quality maternal and newborn care services has been poor [, ].

The findings, conclusions, and views in this Obstetric Care Consensus do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or the U. We are happy to respond to general questions about twin pregnancies. Data sources The assessments collected a broad range of facility specific information: the availability of infrastructure, equipment, consumable supplies, drugs, human resources, service statistics, and the performance of key life-saving procedures, routine delivery and newborn services.

Neonatal Hepatitis B and HBIG• Paxton A, Bailey P, Lobis S, Fry D. Assisted vaginal delivery, preferably with vacuum extractor;• The low use of AVD has been noted in other sub-Saharan African countries and yet, in neighboring Malawi, its use has steadily increased [].

2 and analyzed using Stata. It is currently difficult to quantify other non-anaesthetic procedures that anaesthetists carry out on the delivery suite. Although one of the stated objectives of an EmONC assessment is to collect baseline estimates, few countries have taken advantage of more than one national assessment to show change in these indicators [].

Patient Identification- see WNHS Policy• Other tasks, such as airway and gastric volume assessment, may also benefit from the availability of ultrasound. Two indicators function as proxies for quality of care: an aggregate of the case fatality rate and the intrapartum stillbirth and early neonatal death rate.

Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinical Practice Guidelines Summaries

Only a handful of state Medicaid programs specifically address obstetrical care in their ; some choose to explicitly cover services like video visits with an OBGYN or behavioral health provider in pregnancy, real-time OB ultrasounds via telemedicine, and at home monitoring during pregnancy for certain conditions Table 4.

The standard instruction for the data collector was to choose the direct cause over the indirect cause. General Considerations Relevant for All Levels of Maternal Care• State and regional authorities should work together with the multiple institutions within a region, and with the input from their obstetric care providers, to determine the appropriate coordinated system of care and to implement policies that promote and support a regionalized system of care.

The manuscript represents the views of the authors and does not represent the views of USAID or the US Government. Heat Local Application- see 'Pain Management'• An essential component of all of these programs is the concept of an integrated system in which level III or IV maternal centers provide education and consultation, including training for quality improvement initiatives and severe morbidity and mortality case review, to level I and II facilities and provide for a streamlined system for maternal transport when necessary.

Except outcomes of the newborns, such consequences are poorly understood both in quality and magnitude and remain, to a large extent, without any programmatic response in low-income countries.