15.06.2021 | History

1 edition of Dance ceremonies of the northern Rio Grande Pueblos found in the catalog.

Dance ceremonies of the northern Rio Grande Pueblos

Nambe, Picuris, Pojoaque, San Ildefonso, San Juan, Santa Clara, Taos, Tesuque

  • 679 Want to read
  • 364 Currently reading

Published by Administrator in High Desert Field Guides

    Places:
  • United States
    • Subjects:
    • High Desert Field Guides


      • Download Dance ceremonies of the northern Rio Grande Pueblos Book Epub or Pdf Free, Dance ceremonies of the northern Rio Grande Pueblos, Online Books Download Dance ceremonies of the northern Rio Grande Pueblos Free, Book Free Reading Dance ceremonies of the northern Rio Grande Pueblos Online, You are free and without need to spend extra money (PDF, epub) format You can Download this book here. Click on the download link below to get Dance ceremonies of the northern Rio Grande Pueblos book in PDF or epub free.

      • Title from cover.Written by Dick and Kathryn Huelster with the assistance of Lynn Cline and others.Dial-a-Dance mounted on inside back cover.Includes bibliographical references (p. 28).

        StatementHigh Desert Field Guides
        PublishersHigh Desert Field Guides
        Classifications
        LC Classifications2005
        The Physical Object
        Paginationxvi, 85 p. :
        Number of Pages43
        ID Numbers
        ISBN 100976683903
        Series
        1nodata
        2
        3

        nodata File Size: 6MB.


Share this book
You might also like

Dance ceremonies of the northern Rio Grande Pueblos by High Desert Field Guides Download PDF EPUB FB2


—These forces, or beings, may be either friendly or hostile. About this time, also, feather mantles were in use. The variety of animals living on the arid plateaus of the Southwest was limited. Among the Hopi, where Spanish occupation was brief, there is no exclusion from rites which are public to the natives. This forms a ground coat to fill up pores and give a smooth surface.

The bones of these direct ancestors of the Pueblo Indians are recognized by their round brachycephalic heads and artificially flattened skulls. The men work the fields, the women occasionally helping with the planting, and the entire family joins in the harvest.

Ceremonial Costumes of the Pueblo Indians

Seed corn is kept two years so that in the event of a dry season there will always be enough for another planting. Many legends center around the coyote, whose skin, it was believed, often concealed the metamorphosed body of some immortal creature.

The woolen yarn is soft and lumpy. They have never made or bought intoxicating liquors in the fashion of other tribes about them, and they have never given themselves up to the use of drugs. " [109] The pigment, from whatever source, is ground in a stone mortar or on a metate with a mano.

Many plants are held sacred, "for some of them were dropped to the earth by the Star People; some were human beings before they became plants; others were the property of the gods and all, even those from the heavens, are the offspring of the Earth Mother, for it was she who gave the plants to the Star People before they left the world and became celestial beings.

In return the supernaturals would come and be with them in spirit and would bring prosperity. [24] They also make moccasins and the turquoise and silver jewelry, while the women make the pottery and weave the baskets. These dances then were known by that tribe's name, that is, Navaho, Pawnee, or Apache.