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14.07.2021 | History

4 edition of [Introduction, notes, etc. to] The tragedy of King Richard II found in the catalog.

[Introduction, notes, etc. to] The tragedy of King Richard II

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      • From : The tragedy of KingRichard II. [ca.1893]. pp.iii-vii, 7-35 & 185-208. (London : Blakie).

        Statementnodata
        Publishersnodata
        Classifications
        LC Classifications1893
        The Physical Object
        Paginationxvi, 87 p. :
        Number of Pages40
        ID Numbers
        ISBN 10nodata
        Series
        1
        2The Warwick Shakespeare
        3

        nodata File Size: 2MB.


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[Introduction, notes, etc. to] The tragedy of King Richard II by nodata Download PDF EPUB FB2


412 4 1 In God's name, I'll ascend the regal throne. In the dispute, Henry and Mowbray stand before Richard and call each other traitors.

The Tragedy of King Richard the Second

Uk-ES 006334022 Data from King Richard II. 71 1 3 Your will be done: this must my comfort be, Sun that warms you here shall shine on me; And those his golden beams to you here lent Shall point on me and gild my banishment. Richard II Signet Classic Shakespeare; New York: Signet, 1963; revised edition, 1988; 2nd revised edition 1999• 302 3 2 Glad am I that your highness is so arm'd To bear the tidings of calamity.

Now mark me, how I will undo myself; I give this heavy weight from off my head And this unwieldy sceptre from my hand, The pride of kingly sway from out my heart; With mine own tears I wash away my balm, With mine own hands I give away my crown, With mine own tongue deny my sacred state, With mine own breath release all duty's rites: All pomp and majesty I do forswear; My manors, rents, revenues I forego; My acts, decrees, and statutes I deny: God pardon all oaths that are broke to me!

Hayward had dedicated his version to and when Essex was arrested for rebellion in February 1601 Hayward had already been imprisoned, to strengthen the case against the earl for "incitement to the deposing of the Queen".

Come, gentlemen, let's all go visit him: Pray God we may make notes, and come too late! Charles Forker, "Introduction", William Shakespeare, Richard II, Arden Shakspeare Third Series, ed. 473 5 1 That were some love but little policy.